Why Bluebird Way?

Why Bluebird Way?

Why Bluebird Way?

Why Bluebird Way?

The Mountain Bluebird (Sialia currucoides) is a fairly common resident in the aspen parkland ecoregion. The bluebird was a favourite of Dr. Stewart Van Vliet who purchased the property in 1980, built a home and resided here till his passing in 2003. He constructed bluebird boxes, and in most years there was at least one resident pair, and many bluebirds visiting during migration.

For the past years tree swallow pairs have taken over as the main residents in the intended bluebird boxes. We have installed many more boxes lately, in pairs to better provide opportunity for bluebirds to re-establish themselves. Our strategy is to out-house the swallows! Swallows are also desireable native birds, consumers of insects, and engaging flyers, but we would prefer to have some bluebirds back nesting in some of the boxes. We are delighted to report we had a resident pair of Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia sialis)  summer 2016!  We hope they will return, and eventually with more boxes, we will again also host Mountain Bluebirds. 

Naming the road ‘Bluebird Way’ recognizes the bird that was often seen on posts, fencelines, branches and bird boxes along the road, and the name sets an optimistic tone that more bluebird pairs will return here each spring. The bluebird appears in many songs and stories, associated with happiness and joy. They are a delight to behold at any time! Both mountain and western bluebirds have nested on the property. To support their residency, protection and plantings of native trees, shrubs, grasses and prairie perennial flowers is occurring to provide their preferred food sources.

The address “Bluebird Way off Daisy Lane” sounds rather quaint, presenting easy to recall associated imagery. A prominent entry sign with the bluebird theme will eventually be installed.

Why Bluebird Way?

View of the resident Eastern Bluebird (Sialia sialis) distinguished by the reddish brown breast and being somewhat smaller.  This male most days would use this perch by a wren house in the yard, to quickly fly down and capture insects.

Why Bluebird Way?

A view of native prairie flowers and grass that provide habitat, attracting insects for birds.